In eighth grade I had to pick an independent study project. It was the '80s, the dawn of the Reagan Revolution, and it was cool to emulate Family Ties' Alex P. Keaton (ok, maybe not cool, but cool enough for me), so I picked investing. This was before online brokers, before E-Trade, even before the Internet, so my dad took me down to the local Sears. That's right. Sears. For some reason Sears had decided to offer financial services, so the local office of Dean Witter was squeezed between the lay-away desk and the lawn mowers.

As I sat there, a kindly man in shirtsleeves and a tie explained capital markets. Brokers like him earned their money by knowing who wanted something (the buyer) and who had it (the seller). He served not only as an intermediary, but he understood the goals of each party in order to ensure the trade was successful for both. That, in short, is what any good broker does, be they real estate, stock, or disaster brokers.

Wait. Disaster brokers? Do such things exist? No. But they should. Institutional and cultural barriers undermine the ability of businesses, governments, and NGOs to work together to rebuild after disasters. "Disaster recovery outcome brokers" could overcome these barriers.

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